Eduardo Chillida - Exhibition view, 2008 © Galería Elvira González

Eduardo Chillida

Eduardo Chillida with Homenaje a Calder at Taller Larrañaga, Lezo, 1979 © Zabalaga-Leku. ARS, New York / VEGAP, Madrid 2017 courtesy of Estate of Eduardo Chillida and Hauser & Wirth

San Sebastián, Spain, 1924 - San Sebastián, Spain, 2002
Website

The artist knows what to do but he has to do the unknown for it to be worth.

Eduardo Chillida is one of the greatest sculptors of the 20th century. Born in San Sebastian in 1924, he moved to Madrid to study architecture. In 1947 he accessed to Círculo de Bellas Artes turning his attention to sculpture and drawing.

In 1951 Eduardo Chillida returns to Hernani in the Basque Country, Spain. He abandoned figurative sculpture and began experimenting on industrial materials such as steel and iron. In the 60’s he travalled several times to Italy. These trips generated an enormous interest because of the interaction between the architecture and light. He starts using alabaster; a stone with strong translucent and luminous qualities.

Chillida produced an enormous body of works on paper throughout his career which  allowed him to explore line and form. He produced over two thousand drawings, woodcuts, lithographs, silkscreens and aquatints,  and his reference works Gravitaciones, reliefs where he eliminates the adhesive from the collage, suspending the paper in the space of background.

Chillida received many public commissions for monumental sculptures: El peine del vieno in San Sebastian, Gure Aitaren Etxea in Guernica, The House of Goethe in Frankfurt, Tolerance Monument in Seville; El elogio del horizote in Gijón, Berlín at Bundeskanzleramt in Berlín… Architects, mathematicians, philosophers such as Martin Heidegger and Emile Cioran and poets as Octavio Paz all have written texts and essays about his work. The research for inner space would culminate in the project of the Tindaya mountain in the Canary Islands which was never completed.

Works

Eduardo Chillida, Gravitación, 1995
26 x 40 cm | 10 ¼ x 15 ½ in
Paper

Eduardo Chillida, Lo Profundo es el Aire XV, 1995
82,5 x 96 x 76,5 cm | 32 ½ x 37 ¾ x 30 ¼ in
Alabaster

Eduardo Chillida, Lurra G-12, 1984
17 x 22 x 19,5 cm | 6 ⅝ x 8 ⅜ x 7 ⅜ in
Chamotte clay

Eduardo Chillida, Gravitación, 1995
26 x 40 cm | 10 ¼ x 15 ½ in
Paper

Eduardo Chillida, Lo Profundo es el Aire XV, 1995
82,5 x 96 x 76,5 cm | 32 ½ x 37 ¾ x 30 ¼ in
Alabaster

Eduardo Chillida, Lurra G-12, 1984
17 x 22 x 19,5 cm | 6 ⅝ x 8 ⅜ x 7 ⅜ in
Chamotte clay